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How to set out wall tiles
When it comes to tiling, it’s tempting to jump straight in with both feet. However, we’d always recommend giving yourself some time to plan what you are going to do with your tiles to ensure a) you have enough tiles and b) enough materials to complete your project. Planning also gives you the opportunity to ‘set out’ your tiles using actual tile sizes, including the joint width, avoiding being left with small, awkward gaps at the edges.

Planning the layout of your tiles

Where to start tiling is important so make sure to spend time planning the layout of your tiles. There is no hard or fast rule, and it will often depend on things such as the positions of windows, walls etc but it’s often wise to use the natural focal point of the area to be tiled and have this as your starting point. Planning the tiling in this way means the pattern will be centralised, ensuring a consistently neat finish while applying your tiles.

What tools do you need for setting out tiles?

  • Pencil
  • Tape measure
  • Spirit level
  • Claw hammer
  • General purpose saw
  • Wooden batons x 2

Why it is important to start tiling at the centre of your room

It’s always advisable to start tiling your grid in the centre of a wall, as it’s easier to make sure your pattern is symmetrical. It also means any half-tiles you may need can go at the end of each row and will be of matching size. While it’s tempting to begin in the corner as you would when painting, it may leave you with wonky rows and a messy finish by the time you’re done (which no one wants!). Before starting, you need to know how many tiles you will need per row and to do this, you need to make a gauge rod.

How to use a gauge rod

A gauge rod is a clever way of helping you work out the best position for the tiles and ensure you are not left with thin strips of tile for the edges. It will also help you to see how your tiles are going to fall around windows and doors. You can make a gauge rod from a 50mm x 25mm piece of wood which is around 1800mm in length. Once you’ve got your wood, lay it out on flat surface, preferably the floor, and place a tile flush with the edge. Mark the wood at the edge of the tile with a pencil then position a spacer at the edge of the tile and place a second tile against the spacer, again marking the timber at the edge of the tile. Repeat this process until you’ve reached the end of the wood and, hey presto, you’ve got yourself a gauge rod.

Straight lines

Find the centre of your room and mark a pencil line. Using the gauge rod, measure from the halfway point up and down so you can see where each tile will fall. Your outside tiles should be approximately the same size - so you may need to reposition your central vertical line to get the right position. Once you’ve worked down the wall to where the bottom tile is about half a tile, re-arrange slightly by raising the gauge rod to half a tile and mark the wall once you are happy. Next draw a line straight line across the wall and then get a piece of wood and gently nail it to the wall (don’t do it too hard as you’ll need to take the wood off later). Use this piece of wood as the starting point to tile up from. This will prevent the tiles from moving and ensure your tiling is nice and straight. Next, use your gauge rod vertically and knock in another piece of wood up the wall to make a right angle to ensure your tiles follow a straight line up the wall.

The most popular tiling patterns

Now you are ready to tile! But before you do there’s one last thing you need to do, which is to decide on your tiling pattern. Do you go classical and plump for a linear or diamond style pattern or do you go for a more complex herringbone pattern to give your tiles (and your room) that x-factor?

Linear pattern

The most popular of all the tiling patterns, linear tiles are laid out in straight rectangular lines to form a grid. Alternatively, you can use square tiles to create a linear block. Either way works well, especially when using a contrasting colour grout to give your tiles extra definition.

Diamond pattern

Similar in many ways to the linear pattern, just with the tiles rotated diagonally to give any room a classical feel. The only downside with this pattern is that there will be more cutting involved.

Herringbone pattern

If you want to create a sense of space with your tiles, then a herringbone pattern is ideal. Although a lot more complex to tile, with a lot more planning required, the results speak for themselves. And, just like the other patterns, you can add a twist with either a block herringbone or even a double block herringbone pattern.

Hexagon pattern

Hexagon patterns are guaranteed to make an instant style statement in your home, providing visual interest while enhancing space at the same time.

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding setting out tiles, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility. They will be more than happy to help.
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How to set out floor tiles
When it comes to tiling your floor, it’s tempting to jump straight in with both feet. However, we’d always recommend giving yourself some time to plan what you are going to do with your tiles to ensure a) you have enough tiles and b) enough materials to complete your project. Planning also gives you the opportunity to ‘set out’ your tiles using actual tile sizes, including the joint width, avoiding being left with small, awkward gaps next to your skirting boards.

How to plan the layout of your tiles

Where to start tiling is important so make sure to spend time planning the layout of your tiles. There is no hard or fast rule, and it will often depend on things such as the positions of windows, walls etc but it’s often wise to use the natural focal point of the area to be tiled and have this as your starting point. Planning the tiling in this way means the pattern will be centralised, ensuring a consistently neat finish while applying your tiles. What tools do you need for setting out tiles
  • Pencil
  • Tape measure
  • Spirit level
  • Ready supply of tea and biscuits (the biscuits are an optional extra)

Why it’s important to check your floor is level

Before you do anything check that your floor is level at various points in the room using a straight edge & a spirit level. Fingers crossed it is. If not, and it is out by anything more than 3mm over a 2m straight edge, then before laying any tiles this will need to be correct using floor levelling compound to create a smooth and level surface on which to tile.

Make sure to start tiling at the centre of your room

It’s always advisable when laying out floor tiles is to make sure that you work out from the centre of your room. This ensures your tiles will be correctly positioned and make life a lot easier when extending your tiling pattern towards the edge of your floor.

How to mark your halfway points

Never assume your walls are equal in size so before you do anything measure the opposing walls of your room and mark the centre of each and take a pencil or chalk and draw a straight line between the two points. Repeat for the other two walls and you will have found the centre point of your room.

Can I tile over existing floor tiles?

You can fix tiles to concrete, wooden floorboards (provided you use a Rapid Set Multi Flex adhesive) or even existing floor tiles, but you must make sure the surface is in good condition and correctly prepared. By this, we mean it needs to be even, flat, dry and free from damp, and the correct adhesive must be used at all times. If you need help selecting the right adhesive, click here.

The benefit of dry laying tiles

Now that you’ve found the centre of your room, it’s always worth dry laying a row of tiles in all directions up to the walls in your chosen pattern. Make sure to leave a minimum of 3mm between each tile for your tile spacers to ensure that all your joints are even. If you discover while dry laying that there are only thin pieces of tiles left at the skirting board, it’s worth moving your centre tile until there’s a gap roughly half the size of your tile around the whole edge of the room. Once you’ve done that, and everyone is happy, mark the centre tile with pencil, and you can start tiling for real.

Need more information?

If you have any further questions regarding setting out tiles, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility. They will be more than happy to help.    
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Which adhesive should I use for tiling a wall?
When it comes to choosing the tile adhesive for your home, it is not always as straight forward as it could be, especially with so many products on the market. What’s more, after investing so much time, effort and money on your tiles, it is vital that you do the right thing by them and select the right tile adhesive to ensure they last a long time on your wall. That’s why we’ve created this handy guide to help make selecting (as well as applying) the right adhesive that much easier.

Different tiles require different adhesives

Because there are so many different types of tiles available, there are, in turn, many different types of adhesives of available. But what are they and what the differences between them?

Ready mixed tub adhesives

Ready Mixed Tub adhesives, as the name suggests, are ready to use straight from the tub. Although ready mixed tile adhesives save time because you do not need to make-up the adhesive yourself, and can be used on cement board, plaster and plasterboards, they do have their limitations. Firstly, they shouldn’t be used when installing porcelain tiles (due to their non-porous surface). And, secondly, they should only be used to fix small format, ceramic tiles to a wall. Although this sounds a bit harsh, it is because the drying chemistry behind a ready-mixed product doesn’t function well with areas like floors which require a greater amount of water evaporation.

Standard rapid set cement

Standard Rapid Set Cement is a type of adhesive that comes in powder format.  It should be mixed with water for at least 20 mins to produce the correct form. Standard Rapid Set Cement should be used only for fixing ceramic and porcelain tiles to a solid wall or floor.

Rapid set multi flex cement

And, last, but by no means least, there is Rapid Set Multi Flex. This particular adhesive comes with a latex additive, giving it greater flexibility as well as strength over the Standard Rapid Set Cement.  This makes Rapid Set Multi Flex ideal for tiling over plywood (and other wooden) surfaces that are subject to movement as well as to fix porcelain and natural stone tiles which require more grip.

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding selecting the right adhesives for your home, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility. They will be more than happy to help.
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Which adhesive should I use for tiling floors?
Once you’ve selected your floor tiles, the next thing to cross of your to-do-list when it comes to tiling floors in your bathroom, kitchen or living room is choosing the right adhesive.

Ready mixed vs powdered adhesive

Adhesives (or substrates if you want to get technical) come in two forms – ready mixed or powdered. And, while the former is a lot more convenient, given there is no mixing required, they are generally only suitable for fixing smaller ceramic tiles to walls in areas such as splashbacks. So, avoid wherever possible! The better option for tiling floors is the powdered adhesive. Yes, it can messy as it will need to mixed but it provides a far stronger and longer lasting bond for your tiles, helps your surface cope better with movement and is suitable for both larger ceramic and all porcelain tiles. Don’t forget most adhesives are available in either white or grey. Generally, when using a lighter grout you’d use a white adhesive, and vice versa.

What type of powdered adhesives are available?

All materials are subject to some form of movement over time, usually as a result in changes in temperatures. This is the reason why powdered adhesives are rated either as S1 or S2. S1 adhesives are suitable for most locations, as they allow for movement of up to 5mm. However, in those rooms in your home which are likely to experience the most movement, such as high traffic areas like bathrooms or kitchens, an S2 adhesive is preferable as it will allow for movement over 5mm.

‘Standard’ vs ‘Rapid Setting’ adhesives

Powered adhesives also come in two types – ‘standard’ or ‘rapid setting’. These relate to the working time you have with each product with the latter, for instance, setting within 30 minutes. Obviously, the faster the adhesive sets, the sooner you can start grouting and ultimately finish tiling your floor. However, there are times when it’s a benefit to have a slower setting time such as when laying large format tiles on your floors and you need more time to achieve the right finish. One last thing to consider when it comes to adhesives. Once you’ve done all of the hard work, namely applied your adhesive, then tiles and grout, make sure to give the adhesive time to ‘cure’ before walking on your newly laid tiles. If not, any pressure you might apply might result in the tiles moving and you ending up with an uneven floor.

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding tiling, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility.      
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How to mix tile adhesive
Once you’ve prepared your walls for tiling, set out your tiles and selected the right adhesive for your project, it’s time to get mixing.

What tools do I need for mixing adhesive?

If you’re new to tiling, and don’t have any equipment, we would recommend buying the following prior to mixing and applying your adhesive:
  • Bucket
  • Mixing paddle
  • Bucket Trowel
  • Notched trowel
  • Protective equipment (such as gloves and googles)
  • Cold Clean Water
Once you've got all your equipment, you are ready to start mixing your adhesive And, to help ensure you have correctly mixed your adhesive, we've created this handy step by step guide. Follow this and you should ready to start applying to your chosen surface and begin tiling.

Step 1

It’s really important to follow the manufacturer’s instructions on the packaging, especially when it comes to how much water to put into your bucket to avoid leaving any powder remaining unmixed.

Step 2

Use the mixing paddle to stir the adhesive, making sure to reach into the sides and base of the bucket. Keep mixing until the adhesive is free of any lumps and is a nice smooth, ice cream style consistency.

Step 3

Given that adhesive is a cement-based product, it tends to set quickly when spread evenly onto the wall (see adhesive packaging for how much work time you have), so stick to a small area at first to master your technique and avoid wasting any mixture.

Step 4

Allow 15 – 30 minutes to apply adhesive as well as fit each square metre of tile. Use a notched trowel to create channels into the adhesive as these give you more grip.

Step 5

Push your tile into the adhesive before sliding it away about 5mm and then back again. This will help secure your tile on the wall and reduce the amount of air that can sit between the tile and the wall.

Step 6

Repeat this process with the next tile, using spacers to separate the tiles as you go until your wall is complete. Make sure to check that the tiles are aligned with the wall using a spirit level. If any adhesive gets into the tiles, remove immediately with a damp sponge. Once you’ve laid your tiles wipe of any excess adhesive and ensure the joints are clear of adhesive too, then it’s just a case of putting on the kettle, making a brew and enjoying a well-earned rest, while you wait for the tiles to dry so you can get on with the grouting.

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding using tile adhesive, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility.

Recommended reads

If this has whetted your appetite to learn more about all things tiles, then why not check out these related advice articles: What is the best adhesive for tiling a wall  What is the best adhesive for tiling a floor        
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How to tile a wall
  Whether you are tiling a whole wall in your bathroom or just a splash back in your kitchen, tiling requires patience, planning and a bit of perseverance. Thankfully Tile Warehouse is to here to help with this step-by-step advice guide to tiling a wall to help you achieve the best possible finish in your home. However, before you begin tiling, it’s important to plan what you are going to do. You’ll need to calculate the number of tiles you are going to need (check our Tile Calculator if you haven’t done this) as well as the pattern you are trying to achieve on your wall.  Once you’ve done all of this and prepped your wall, so its nice and smooth, it’s time to start tiling like a pro!

What tools do you need to tile a wall?

  • Tile adhesive
  • Grout
  • Tile spacers
  • Notched trowel
  • Tile cutter
  • Grout float
  • Bucket and sponge
  • Spirit level
  • Rubber mallet
  • Gloves and googles
  • Dust sheets
  • Wooden baton

Step 1

If you haven’t already make sure to cover the floor (and any furniture) with sheets as tiling can get messy. The time-honoured method for ensuring straight lines when tiling walls involves nailing a wooden baton into your wall and using this as your guide. Before you do anything though make sure your baton is level using a spirit level. Once you are sure that your baton is perfectly straight it’s time to get tiling. Remember to always start at the centre of the row and work your way out towards the edges.

Step 2

Next, mix your adhesive, making sure to always follow the manufacturer’s instructions. If you need help selecting the right adhesive look at our guide to wall adhesives. Once your adhesive is ready, scoop up a small amount of tile adhesive with the trowel and press it onto the wall above your baton, spreading it with your notched trowel at 45 degrees. This ensures that an equal amount of adhesive will get behind each tile before applying your first tile with a light twisting and pressing motion. Place the next tile in the same way, not forgetting to insert tile spacers fully between your tiles and then repeat until you get to the end of the wall where it’s likely you’ll have to cut a tile. While it can be tempting to apply all the adhesive in one go – don’t. Never apply more than one square metre at a time, as the adhesive could start hardening before you’ve got all your tiles in place.

Step 3

Once you’re first line of tiles is done, check them over to make sure you are happy they are all straight and evenly spaced. If you have any concerns, just remove the tile and reapply with the same twisting motion. It’s much easier to do this now than once the adhesive has set.

Step 4

If you’re happy, then it’s time to remove your wooden baton and repeat the process on the next row. Remember to go easy on the adhesive and only apply enough for a square metre at a time. And, as previously mentioned, always check your work as you go along. This includes cleaning any adhesive residue on the tiles using a damp sponge (as it’s a pig to get off once it’s dried). You may also need to clean out excess adhesive from the grout joints. If this is the case, try not to dislodge and adhesive behind the tiles.

Step 5

Now you’ve fixed all of the whole tiles, you’re ready to fill the edges and corners of the wall. Using your tape measure, measured the required space, allowing for your grout lines, and then mark the necessary cut on your tile with a pencil. Ceramic tiles are relatively soft compared with porcelain and most straight cuts can be done with a manual tile cutter. However, when it comes to porcelain tiles, together with more complex cuts, we would always recommend using an electric tile cuter. Better to be safe than sorry!

Step 6

Once you’ve cut your corners (excuse the pun!), apply a small amount of adhesive, spreading with your notched trowel to get that famous ‘combed’ look, before fitting your remaining tiles. Again, check your work as you go along, and if you’re not happy, lift and re-apply. That should be it for tiling on your wall.  Now, it’s just a case of leaving the adhesive to dry and adhere your tiles to the wall before grouting. And, in true Blue Peter style, here’s one we made earlier in the form of our guide to grouting tiles.

How to use tile trims

It’s quite likely that you will have bare tile edges on show, especially if you are tiling only part-way up a wall. You can always leave these tile edges, but we would always recommend using a tile trim. Not only do they look better but they help protect the edge of the tile. Available in a variety of finishes, applying tile trims is straightforward. Check that the depth of the trim is equal to the depth of the tile before cutting the trim to size with a hacksaw. Apply adhesive to the back of the trim lip and position this lip behind your tiles. If the trim has a protective wrap on, don’t remove it until you’ve finished to help keep the surface clean.

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding tiles, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility. They will be more than happy to help.    
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How to tile a floor
You’ve done all the hard work prepping your room. Now it’s time to have some fun tiling! And to help you achieve the best finish on your bathroom or kitchen floor, we’ve created this step-by-step guide to achieving the perfect tiled floor

What tools do you need to tile a floor?

Whether you are laying your tiles into cement, concrete or wooden floors, you are going to need certain tools to get the job done properly. These include:
  • Gauging trowel
  • Grout float
  • Knee pads (optional)
  • Notched spreader
  • Pencil
  • Rubber mallet
  • Safety gloves
  • Safety googles
  • Spirit level
  • Tile file
  • Tile spacers
As previously discussed in our how to set out in our How to Set Out Floor Tiles guide, when tiling your floor, you’ll need to start from the centre of the room and work your way out to each corner, one at a time. It is well-worth practising at least once with a dry lay to familiarise yourself with your chosen pattern. Don’t forget that you will need to leave the room after you’ve laid your tiles, so make sure to plan ahead, and work into the furthest corners first so that you finish by the door, not the other way round, otherwise you might find yourself having to exit via the window. The other option, especially when tiling popular rooms such as the bathroom or kitchen, is to tile one half, leave it to set so part of the room can still be used, and then return the next day and complete the other half. It’ll take a little longer but is a practical solution for lots of people. And, make sure before you start tiling to follow the tile adhesive instructions on the back of the adhesive pack as they may very well vary depending on the surface on which you are laying tiles.

Step by step guide to laying tiles

Step 1

Starting at your centre point, use a gauging trowel to place your tile adhesive on the floor, and a notched trowel to spread your tile adhesive across an area of roughly one metre. Then draw the serrated edge of the trowel back through the tile adhesive to form ridges. This will create an even depth of adhesive on which to lay your tiles. Step 2 Next place your first tile firmly into the adhesive, using a twisting action to bed it into the adhesive. Repeat the process with the next tile and use tile spacers between each tile to ensure there is a 3mm gap between each for your grout. Step 3 Check your tiles regularly with a spirit level to make sure they are flat. If not, tap them lightly with your rubber mallet to level them out. Also try and remove any adhesive that may have got onto the face of the tile with a damp cloth as you go along as it’s much harder to remove once its set. Step 4 Once all your tiles are down, you’ll need to wait until the adhesive has set before you walk on them. This can be as much as 48 hours. As previously mentioned, if you are tiling a busy room like a bathroom, it’s well worth considering tiling one half one day and the other half the next day. It’s entirely up to you of course! Step 5 Invariably, you will find you have gaps to fill in the corners of your room, for which you’ll need to measure and cut your tiles to fit that space accordingly. Don’t rush this bit even though it may be tempting. Floor tiles tend to be heavier (and thicker) than wall tiles, so you’ll need a heavy-duty manual or electric tile cutter for this job. Always wear gloves and googles to cut along your marked line. If there are any rough edges remaining after you’ve cut your tile, smooth these off using a tile file.

Step 6

Once you have the right-sized piece, position it in the space to check whether you need to make any further adjustments. If it doesn’t quite fit, you can use tile nippers and a tile file for slight adjustments. When they fit perfectly, apply adhesive to the back of the tiles and fix them to the floor and you are done. Now it’s just a case of giving the adhesive plenty of time to set before you start on the next part of your project, which is grouting your tiles.

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding tiles, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility. They will be more than happy to help.  
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How to cut tiles
Whenever you are tiling a floor or wall, it is more than likely that you will need to cut tiles to fit a specific space or alternatively to help achieve a more complex laying pattern. When cutting tiles, it is important to have the right tools. Why? Whether it’s a tile cutter, tile saw or tile scorer, using the right tools will ensure a clean and tidy cut each time, making your life easier when it comes to fixing that tile to the floor or wall.

Safety first

Cutting tiles can leave lots of sharp edges, as well as fragments, so it’s better be to be safe than sorry. Before you do anything make sure you are wearing the appropriate protective equipment such as gloves and googles. Kneepads are also a nice thing to have as tiling tends to involve a lot of time spent on your hands and knees, but they aren’t an essential.

What are the best ways to cut tiles?

Tiles can be cut in a variety of ways depending on the tile and the way in which the tile needs to be cut. If you are cutting ceramic tiles, for instance, then a tile scribe, tile saw or a suitable tile cutter should be more than adequate to give you a professional finish. When it comes to porcelain tiles, which tend to be stronger, then make sure you use a suitable tile cutter and the correct blade. More often than not you will find that an electric tile cutter with the correct diamond-blade is the best option. However, in bathrooms, where you might have to cut around toilets, for those cuts that cannot be achieved using a machine, then invariably a tile nipper is the perfect tool for the job.

How to use a manual tile cutter

Manual tile cutters (sometimes known as score and snap or rail cutters) are perfect for cutting ceramic tiles up to 8mm thick. They follow a simple process of scoring a tile, cutting along the score line using a scoring wheel attached to a rail and then using a breaker to snap the tile. If the cut isn’t clean, and the edges of the tile look slightly rough, use a file to smooth the edges. The only downside to a manual tile cutter is that they can only be used for straight cuts. If you need to cut right angles or curves, or you are planning on cutting thicker porcelain tiles, then you will need to invest in an electric tile cutter.

How to use an electric tile cutter

Electric tile cutters (also known as a wet cutter) use water to keep both the blade and tile cool at all times. This ensures a better cut, less friction through the tile (preventing cracking), less dust and a longer lasting blade. These particular cutters tend to be used to cut hard porcelain, marble, granite and other natural stones. They are equally easy to use as their manual counterparts. Simply press the area of the tile to be cut gently against the blade and let it do the work (not the other way round).

Can you use angle grinders to cut tiles?

Angle grinders can also be used to cut tiles. However, they spin much faster than wet cutters so you must ensure you have the right blade. Always check the manufacturer’s guidelines on which disc to use prior to starting your project as using the wrong blade on an angle grinder can cause friction making the tile to heat up too fast, often causing cracking and chipping.

How to use a tile nipper

Tile nippers are brilliant for cutting small, rounded edges on ceramic and porcelain tiles up to 8mm thick (as well as for cutting smaller glass mosaics). It is always advisable to mark the area that needs to be cut with a pencil and then score using a scribe before making your cuts with your tile nipper. Take your time with your nippers, making slow, gradual cuts. That way you avoid snipping off too much. Don't forget to wear your gloves and safety goggles when nipping and smooth off any rough edges with a file before fitting your tile!

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding tile cutting, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility. They will be more than happy to help.
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How to waterproof a wet room
While tiles for bathrooms are naturally waterproof, the same can’t be said about the joints between your tiles. Which is why we would always recommend when tiling any wet areas such as a bathroom you will need to ensure the walls and floor are fully waterproofed (also known as Tanking) to avoid any water leaking through and causing damage to your property. Using a liquid membrane underneath your tiles gives you the peace of mind of knowing that what you are fitting onto your walls will remain water resistant and that the only route for the water is down the drain.

Paint on waterproofing system

The best way of doing this is by using a paint on system for your bathrooms walls and floors. To tank them, we recommend using the Ready to Use Waterproofing System. This has been specifically created to make the job of waterproofing a wet area quick and easy. Used prior to fixing tiles, the Ready to Use kit ensures a watertight barrier preventing water penetration into moisture sensitive backgrounds such as plasterboard and may be applied to wall angles, corners, around pipe penetrations and structural fixtures. Plus, the Ready for Use Waterproofing System is suitable for use on a wide variety of surfaces such as backerboard, cement, concrete, plaster, plasterboard and sand rendering. Although originally designed for use with domestic showers, Ready for Use can also be used in other areas which require waterproofing such as wet rooms and bathrooms. Ready for Use must be used in conjunction with ceramic tiling.

Preparing your surface for tanking

Before applying products such as Ready to Use, your surfaces must be sound and flat, so remove any old tiles, tile adhesive, plaster as well nails or screws. Any voids or gaps should be filled with suitable filler or sealant and allowed to dry. If you have any cracks up to 1.5mm may be bridged should be covered with Corner Tape and Waterproof Coating. The coating should not be used to level out irregularities. If your shower tray is already in place, then make sure to apply coating and tape from the top level of the tray. If waterproofing prior to the fitting of a shower tray, apply coating and tape from floor level and across the floor if required.

How to tank your bathroom

The actual process of tanking really couldn’t be simpler:
  • First use a paintbrush to apply the Primer to shower area walls to the full height and leave until touch dry.
  • Next apply a layer of Waterproof Coating with a separate paint brush to your walls that require tape such as corners, tray or floor junctions etc.
  • While the Waterproof Coating is still wet, cut the Corner Tape to the required length and push into the wet layer of coating ensuring no voids are left beneath the tape.
  • Then, form a continuous strip around the shower, slightly overlapping the shower tray. To form the corner section cut halfway up the tape and fold down and around to form corner. Press into the wet layer of coating.
  • Next apply a second layer of the Waterproof Coating over the tape and remaining wall area up to the required height.
  • That’s your walls done. Now it’s time to focus on your floors. Apply the Primer to the floor and leave until touch dry before applying the Waterproof Coating and any tape, applying coating where the walls and floor meet.
  • If you have timber floors (or heavy-duty areas) we would suggest using a matting system such as Durabase CI++ Matting. This acts as a waterproof and crack resistant membrane, helping to isolate the tile from the original surface.
  • Press matting firmly into wet layer of coating, ensuring air pockets are removed. Then apply a second layer of Waterproof Coating over the matting to ensure complete coverage.
  • All that’s left to do now is leave the waterproofing to dry. 24 hours should be more than ample time before its time to apply a suitable tiling adhesive so you can start tiling!
And there you have it. Everything you need to know about waterproofing a wet room (and more).

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding tile cutting, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility. They will be more than happy to help.
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