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Preparation

How to choose the right tiles for your home
[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="566"] Quarry Red 15 x 15 Tile[/caption] Tiles are integral to any home makeover project – whether it’s your bathroom, kitchen or living room. Why? Your tiles play a pivotal role in setting the tone, colour, even style of your room. However, choosing the right tiles for your floor and wall takes a lot of thought and is something you shouldn’t rush into – especially with so many tiles on the market. This is why we’ve created this handy guide to help ensure you pick the right tile for the right room.

The best place to lay your tiles

Tiles just don’t come in different sizes, shapes and finishes. There are also different tiles for different rooms. Browse the Tile Warehouse site and you’ll find tiles just for walls, tiles just for floors and tiles that can be used on both or even outdoors too. Confused? Don’t be. This guide will help explain everything you need know. It’s important before you start your project to have an idea of where you would like your tiles to go in your room and the effect you are trying to achieve with them. If you are looking to create a sense of space, particularly in a smaller room, then you might want to think about applying the same tiles to the floors and walls. Alternatively, if you’d like to make a statement, then you might want to think about bright, bold colours or patterns to add a sense of theatre to a wall to ensure it becomes a real feature in your chosen room. Don’t forget about your garden, especially as you head into the summer months, and how you could potentially take the indoors outdoors by using the same floor tiles in the kitchen as well as the patio to extend your living space. As you can see the options are endless, and we haven’t even scratched the surface.

Make sure to order sample tiles

Once you’ve got an idea of where you want your tiles to go, then it’s always advisable to purchase a sample. Not only do you get to see the tiles close up, but it also gives you the opportunity to place them in the room or rooms you are thinking of tiling to see how the tiles look in different lights. Don’t forget that Tile Warehouse has a dedicated sample service which allows you to order cut samples as well as full size samples for free delivery to your home.

Selecting the right colour tiles

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="547"] Arlington Black & White Chequer 28.8x28.8[/caption] Tiles don’t just come in different shapes and sizes. They are also come in a variety of colours. Obviously, the choice is entirely down to yourself, but we’ve highlighted some of the most popular choices. White tiles will make your room feel bright and airy but will show up any marks immediately while neutral colours such as beige or cream will help keep things calm but overuse can make a room look a little bit bland. Grey or black tiles will help make a statement and are great if you’ve got kids and they love nothing more than touching the walls but choose the room wisely as too many dark tiles in a small space can make it feel unnecessarily dark. If you’re thinking of adding some glamour to your room, then either bright coloured tiles or tiles with a metallic or gloss finish should do the trick. And don’t forget that gone are the days when grouts came in one or two shades. Like the tiles themselves, the choice of colours for grouts is endless, so even if you decide to play it safe, you can always spice things up with a coloured grout.

Choosing the right sized tile

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="567"] Underground Gloss White 10 x 20[/caption] Size matters, especially when it comes to tiles. It’s worth thinking about the proportions of your room and follow the principle of bigger tiles on the floor and smaller tiles on the wall or the same size for both. So, if you want your room to feel bigger than it is, then large tiles are the order of the day. Conversely, mosaic tiles are ideal for adding some extra detail or patterns as well as tiling curved surfaces, while rectangular tiles can make a room feel wider. Square tiles are great in modern homes with all those straight lines.

What is the difference between ceramic and porcelain tiles?

At first glance ceramic and porcelain tiles look very similar. And, while they share common traits, they are fundamentally different in terms of the way they are manufactured and the surfaces to which they can be applied. Both ceramic and porcelain tiles are made from clay, however porcelain tiles use a much denser clay with the addition of other raw materials, such as quartz. Not only is the mineral make up different, but the manufacturing process also provides each with their own characteristics and qualities. Porcelain tiles are fired at much higher temperatures and pressed at much greater pressures than ceramic tiles, reducing the voids and cavities in the tile making them less porous and increasing their strength and durability. As porcelain tiles have a lower water absorption rate than ceramic tiles they are less likely to crack or fracture with changes in temperature, making them perfect for use outdoors. Due to their increased strength and durability, porcelain tiles are also ideal for heavy footfall areas such as hallways and kitchen floors.

Plain or patterned tiles

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="634"] Jupiter Blue Patterned Tile 45 x 45[/caption] The last thing to consider when choosing your tiles is whether to go for plain or patterned. The former is great if you are after a ‘minimalist’ type look while the latter will help you make a statement which won’t fail to get noticed when people visit your home. The choice when it comes to all things tiles is entirely yours. Hopefully we’ve given you some food for thought, and whichever tiles you choose, be they plain or patterned, ceramic or porcelain, rectangular or square, with a little help from Tile Warehouse we can help to transform your room.

Do you sell anti-slip tiles?

Floor tiles are usually chosen based on their aesthetic qualities, but the technical side of tiling is important too and your chosen tiles should be suitable for the space in which you’re tiling. Every tile is assigned a slip resistance rating, based on this rating you can assume which tiles are suitable for your project. For example, a high slip-resistant tile is suitable for a wet areas such as a bathroom where the risk of slipping is greater. For more information on our slip resistance classifications, why not read on our guide to slip resistant tiles.

Why it is important to consider the weight of the tiles

When tiling onto walls don’t forget to factor in the weight of the tiles. We would always recommend that the background you’re tiling onto can take the weight of your tiles plus the adhesive and grout. As a rule, if you allow for 3kg per m² in your weight calculation to allow for your adhesive and grout you can’t go wrong. Generally, skimmed plaster walls or plasterboard have a maximum weight loading of 20kg/m2 while bare plasterboard can take up to 32kg/m2. Backer board are becoming an increasingly popular surface on which to tile. They not only provide a clean and flat surface on which to tile but they also have a maximum weight loading of 200kg/m2. For more details on this please read our handy guide to all thing’s backer board.  

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding selecting the right tiles for your home, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility.      
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How to remove old floor tiles
Removing floor tiles is a relatively straightforward but potentially hazardous job. Which is why we’ve created this handy advice guide to help you remove those unwanted floor tiles safely and securely

Be safe rather than sorry

Tile fragments can be very sharp so it’s better to be safe rather than sorry and wear protective gloves as well as safety googles. It’s also advisable to wear a long sleeve top and clear up as you go along wherever possible.

Make sure to protect your furniture

It’s not just yourself that needs to cover up. Old tiles tend to have a habit of flying off in every direction. So, make sure to protect your furniture against potential damage. An old sheet should be more than satisfactory although if you have cardboard lying about even better.

The best tools for removing tiles

Once you’ve covered everything and everyone up, it’s time to take off the old tiles off the floor. To do this you’ll need a chisel and a hammer. If you don’t have a chisel, then a large, flat headed screwdriver will also do the job. Removing the first tile will always be the hardest as there is usually no natural access from any side. Using the bottom of your hammer, tap the corners of random tiles, and if you find a loose tile, then prize it out with a chisel. If there are no loose tiles, then you’ll have no choice but to break one. To do this simply place the chisel in the centre of one tile and hit with the hammer. This will shatter the tile, giving you access to the remainder of that tile. Once you’ve removed one tile, access to the gaps behind the other floor tiles will be a lot easier. To remove the remainder of tiles, simply sit the chisel against the wall with its point tucked under the tile you’re working on and tap it with the hammer until its sunk behind the tile. Then, pull the chisel towards and it will prize the tile away.

Why it’s important to remove adhesive

Once all of the tiles have been removed, we would always recommend getting off as much of the dried adhesive as possible. It should come away fairly easily (famous last words!) using a scraper to leave you with a flat surface. This will make life so much easier for yourself when it comes time to applying your new tiles to your floor.

How to dispose of old tiles

Broken tiles tend to have lots of sharp edges so make sure you put all your old tiles etc into a cardboard box before disposing of them (as bin bags tend to rip). Make sure to have a dustpan and brush handy to sweep up any loose pieces that may be on the floor and give the room a good hoover to ensure everything has been cleaned up. If you’ve managed to take off any old tiles intact, don’t throw them away. They might come in handy for another project. Alternatively, they are perfect for things such as coasters in the home. Check out our upcycling advice article for loads more tips on what to do with your old tiles.

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding removing your old tiles, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility.

Recommended reads

If this has whetted your appetite to learn more about all things tiles, then why not check out these related advice articles: How to set our floor tiles How to tile a floor      
Read more
How to remove old wall tiles
Removing old wall tiles is a relatively straightforward but potentially hazardous job. Which is why we’ve created this handy advice guide to help you remove those unwanted wall tiles safely and securely.

Be safe rather than sorry

Tile fragments can be very sharp so it’s better to err on the side of caution and wear protective gloves as well as safety googles. It’s also advisable to wear a long sleeve top and clear up as you go along.

Make sure you protect your furniture

It’s not just yourself that needs to cover up. Old tiles tend to have a habit of coming off the walls in every direction. So, if you are in the bathroom for instance, make sure to protect your sink, shower or toilet against potential damage. An old sheet should be more than satisfactory although if you have cardboard lying about in the garage even better.

What are the best tools for removing wall tiles?

Once you’ve covered everything and everyone up, it’s time for the fun bit, namely taking the old tiles of the wall. To do this you’ll need a chisel and a hammer. If you don’t have a chisel, then a large, flat headed screwdriver will be sufficient. Removing the first tile from your wall will always be the hardest as there is usually no natural access from any side. Using the bottom of your hammer, tap the corners of random tiles, and if you find a loose tile, then prize it out with a chisel. If there are no loose tiles, then you’ll have no choice but to break one. To do this simply place the chisel in the centre of one tile and hit with the hammer. This will shatter the tile, giving you access to the remainder of that tile. Once you’ve removed one tile, access to the gaps behind the other wall tiles will be a lot easier. To remove the remainder of tiles, simply sit the chisel against the wall with its point tucked under the tile you’re working on and tap it with the hammer until its sunk behind the tile. Then, pull the chisel towards and it will prize the tile away.

Why it’s important to remove adhesive

Once all of the tiles have been removed, we would always recommend getting off as much of the dried adhesive as possible. It should come away fairly easily (famous last words!) using your chisel and hammer to leave you with a flat surface. This will make life so much easier for yourself when it comes time to applying your new tiles.

How to get rid of old wall tiles

Broken wall tiles tend to have lots of sharp edges so make sure you put all your old tiles etc into a cardboard box before disposing of them (as bin bags tend to rip). Make sure to have a dustpan and brush handy to sweep up any loose pieces that may be on the floor and give the room a good hoover to ensure everything has been cleaned up. If you’ve managed to take off any old tiles intact, don’t throw them away. They might come in handy for another project. Alternatively, they are perfect for things such as coasters in the home. Check out our upcycling advice article for loads more tips on what to do with your old tiles.

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding removing your old tiles, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility.

Recommended reads

If this has whetted your appetite to learn more about tiling, then why not check out these related advice articles:      
Read more
How to prepare a floor for tiling
From bathrooms to kitchens, hallways to living rooms, tiles are tailor made for protecting the floors in your home. But before you start shifting all of your furniture out of the way to begin tiling there are a number of things you need to do before you can get started.

What to do before tiling your floor

Measure your floors

Make sure to measure the floor before ordering your tiles. If you are struggling, then use our free tile calculator tool to work out the total number of tiles that you will require. And, don’t forget to order tiles that are suitable for floors. You would be surprised how many people don’t! It’s also advisable to buy at least 10% more tiles when ordering in case get broken when you are fitting them at home.

Check the state of your floors

Before tiling your floor, you need to make sure that the floor surface is suitable for tiling, there should be no movement in the floor so any floorboards that are loose or creaking must be secured to the joists to stop them from moving. It is essential that any existing timber floor is stable, clean and in good condition. Floors should be sufficiently rigid and stable. When tiling on to wooden floors any unsupported movement in the floor can cause tiles to crack, and the floor should be able to support the additional weight without any deflection (bounce in the floor). If tiling on to a concrete base then the surface should be level with no dips, if there are dips then we would recommend using a self-levelling compound to create a smooth and level surface. This preparation stage is vital as once tiled you will not be able to correct this easily.  If you have any questions regarding the right preparation, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility.

Plywood or backboards?

Traditionally you would tile directly on to plywood on your floors to provide you with a nice smooth surface on which to lay your tiles. Things have moved on and most people now prefer to use, backer boards such as Hardibacker, Why? They are nice and rigid, give you consistent floor height and are especially suited as a tiling base. They can be used for tiling wet areas such as bathrooms, kitchens and showers as they are resistant to permanent water damage and does not need to be treated before tiling.

Bathrooms/Shower rooms (wetrooms)

Extra care and attention must be exercised when tiling domestic showers. It is recommended in a power shower or wet room area to waterproof (sometimes known as ‘tanking’) the walls and floor to ensure the room is fully waterproof.

What tools do I need to fit floor tiles?

Once you’ve measured up your space, prepared your surface, selected your tiles together with your adhesives and grouts, you then need to turn your attention to the tools you will need to complete your tiling project. To help we’ve compiled our top essential floor tiling tools:
  • Tile cutters
  • Tile nippers (to nip small chunks out of your tiles)
  • Tile spacers
  • Levelling clips
  • A bucket (and preferably a big one as tiling can be a messy business especially when mixing adhesives and grouts)
  • Mixing paddle (for mixing grout and adhesive)
  • Grout float (to press the grout in between your tiles)
  • A trowel (to spread adhesives)
  • Rubber mallet (for tapping tiles into place)
  • Sealant (to seal your edges)
  • And, last but by no means, end-of-work cleaning solution, clean up pads and a sponge to wipe away all the grout that’s still left on your tiles.
That’s it. All you need to do now is put the kettle on, make yourself a cup of tea and start tiling!

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding tiling in your home, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility.

Recommended reads

If this has whetted your appetite to learn more about all things tiles, then why not check out these related advice articles: How to level a floor for tiling How to tile a floor
Read more
How to prepare a wall for tiling
Preparation is the key when it comes to tiling. Which is why we’ve created this guide to help ensure your walls are ready for when it comes time to tile. The key is to take your time and don’t worry if you make a mistake. Plus, most of the advice is common sense and, if followed, will make your tiling project that much easier.

What to do before tiling a wall

There are a few basics to consider before tiling your wall:
  • Remove all hooks, nails or screws from your wall
  • Remove any loose plaster
  • Remove any wallpaper
  • Fill any large cracks or holes in the wall (with a suitable filler)
  • Make sure the wall is level if filling in any cracks or holes. It’s always advisable to sand it down as well so it’s nice and smooth
  • Wipe the wall with a damp cloth so it’s clear of any dirt or dust
  • If there are any bumps on the wall which are more than 4 – 5mm make sure to sand these down as well

Other things to consider before tiling your wall

Make sure to measure the wall before ordering your tiles. If you are struggling, then use our free tile calculator tool to work out the total number of tiles that you will require. It’s also advisable to buy at least 10% more tiles when ordering in case get broken when you are fitting them at home.

Can I tile onto any surface?

Sadly not. There is no one size fits all approach when it comes to tiling. All surfaces will need preparing correctly, freshly plastered walls will need at least 30 days to fully dry and if you are tiling over brick, block work or cement then we’d recommend using a cement board such as Hardiebacker. Also, when tiling onto walls make sure to factor in the weight of the tiles. You should allow 3kg per m² in your weight calculation. This will cover the weight of the adhesive and grout too. Guidance weights for suitable tiling surfaces are:
  • Gypsum Plaster – up to 20KG/m2
  • Gypsum Plasterboard – direct without a plaster skim up to 32KG/m2
  • XPS Boards (Wedi) – up to 120KG/m2
  • Cement Boards (HardieBacker) – up to 200KG/m2
Surfaces must be level, dry and free of dust, grease or any loose material and completely secure without any obvious movement and capable of carrying the additional weight of the tiles and adhesive. Don’t forget that if you are planning to tile in the bathroom or shower room these will need to be fully waterproofed prior to tiling. NOTE: Under British Standards BS 5385 Part 1, plywood is not a suitable substrate for the direct fixing of wall tiles, therefore when tiling onto walls, a tile backer board is recommended. For more information check out our guides to Backerboards and Wet Room Preparation.

Can I tile over old tiles?

Many people do tile straight over their existing tiles providing the existing tiles have be soundly bonded to the walls. If the old tiles de-bond from the wall and fall off, then so will the new ones so make sure the old tiles are well fixed. One way to check is to gently tap them. If it sounds very hollow then they are likely not well bonded. Pay particular attention to tiles in your bathroom as these tend to be the ones which have the most bonding problems. If there are any loose tiles remove them with a chisel and a hammer and fill in the cavity. Once this is done, the existing tiles need to be cleaned as any grease or dirt could affect the bond of the adhesive used for the new tiles. See our list of suitable products for clean your tile surface. And, as previously mentioned, don’t exceed the tile weight limit for the substrate and factor in the weight of any existing tiles.

Top 10 tiling tools

Once you’ve measured up your space, prepared your surface, selected your tiles together with your adhesives and grouts, you then need to turn your attention to the tools you will need to complete your tiling project. But what do you really need and what can you do without? Here’s our top 10 essential tiling tools:
  • PPE - Gloves, mask and protective glasses (to keep you safe from dust and debris)
  • Measuring tape (to help work out how many tiles you are going to need)
  • Tile cutters
  • Tile nippers (to nip small chunks out of your tiles
  • Tile spacers
  • A bucket (and preferably a big one as tiling can be a messy business especially when mixing adhesives and grouts)
  • Mixing paddle (for mixing grout and adhesive)
  • Grout float (to press the grout in between your tiles)
  • A trowel (to spread adhesives)
  • And, last but by no means, a sponge and a suitable end of work cleaner to wipe away all the grout that’s still left on your tiles, but you can see because it’s dried)
That’s all the preparation done. It’s now time to start tiling. Ready?

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding removing your old tiles, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility.
Read more
How to level a floor for tiling
If you want your new tiles to go down on your floor without the risk of them cracking, then you will need to ensure that the surface onto which they are laid is nice and level. Years ago, concrete would have been poured over the original floors and covered with carpet or rugs to hide the evidence. Thankfully things have moved on, and the introduction of self-levelling compounds has proved a life saver in those parts of the house where the floor might dip or need filling in, with the polymer-modified cement helping to smooth out all those bumps. Even better, self-levelling products can be used on a wide variety of substrates such as concrete, screed, tiles and timber floors. Which is why we’ve created this handy guide to explain the quickest and easiest way to level your floors at home prior to beginning tiling.

How to prepare your room for levelling

If you are planning on levelling your floor your subfloor will need to be primed using a product such as Prime Time. Before you apply your primer though make sure the surface is clean, dry and free of dust as well as anything like existing paints, adhesives etc as these can stop the levelling product bonding with the surface. Once your primer has been applied leave it to dry thoroughly before mixing your self-leveller ready to use.

How to mix self-levelling compound

  • When mixing a self-levelling compound such as The Leveller always consult the manufacturers instructions in terms of ratios of powder to cold, clean water as excess water will affect drying times.
  • Then pour the recommend amount of water in a large clean bucket and gradually mix in your levelling powder with your mixing paddle
  • When all the powder is added continue to mix until you have a lump free consistency.
  • Once complete you can then pour onto the floor and spread using the smooth of a notched trowel.
  • A spiked roller must be used on the newly-laid screed to release trapped air bubbles to stop them curing on the surface and ruining the finish of the leveller.
  • We would recommend starting at the furthest point in the room and working your way back to the door to avoid walking over your hard work. If you are covering a large room, it might be worth battening off areas into sections.
All that’s left to do it wait for your self-levelling compound to dry and then the fun bit starts – namely tiling your floors. Why not use this time to practice dry laying your preferred tiling pattern?

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding selecting the right tiles for your home, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility.

Recommended reads

If this has whetted your appetite to learn more about all things tiles, then why not check out these related advice articles: How to set our floor tiles What are the best adhesives for tiling a floor
Read more
How to use backer boards

What is a backer board?

Traditionally you have would have used either plasterboard or plywood as your substrate when tiling wet areas in your home. But in recent years these have been replaced by cement-based backer boards. They have proven to be the perfect base on which to tile in your bathroom or kitchen thanks to their waterproof qualities and the fact that they don’t need to be treated before tiling your floor or wall. They can also hold more weight, in terms of your adhesive, grout and tiles, compared with other popular surfaces such as plastered walls, plasterboard or Wedi boards, up to 10 times more in some instances.

What are the weight limits for wall substrates?

  • Gypsum Plaster – up to 20KG/m2
  • Gypsum Plasterboard – direct without a plaster skim up to 32KG/m2
  • XPS Boards (Wedi) – up to 120KG/m2
  • Cement Boards (HardieBacker) – up to 200KG/m2
Our favourite at Tile Warehouse is HardiBacker. Not only are they easy to install but they can be fitted directly onto a stud wall or onto a wooden or timber floor. They have been ingeniously designed thanks to products such as Portland Cement to make them all-weather resilience. These give HardiBacker unique characteristics such as resistance to fire and water damage well as rotting, warping and UV – making them far more longer lasting than other brands. As a bonus, they come with a 10-year limited guarantee.

How to fit backer board to floorboards

The ideal support for floorboards is the 6mm HardieBacker boards (although you can use a 12mm boards if additional height is required). The HardieBacker should be installed onto a clean and smooth surface, so make sure to remove any debris or dust. Also remove or fix any floor damages such as uneven, warped or loose floorboards. To avoid excessive movement, which can lead to tile cracks, we would also recommend using a 15mm WBP plywood or an 18mm T&G flooring grade chipboard. The board joints should be staggered in a brick pattern and should not align with subfloor joints. You will find that the boards can be easily scored and snapped using a HardieBacker scoring knife. If there are any gaps of 3mm or more between the wall edges and the floor these should be filled with a moisture resistant sealant. Then simply apply a gap filing bed of tile adhesive using a 6mm notched trowel and slowly embed your boards into the wet adhesive with a sliding motion. The boards will then need to be fixed to the subfloor using a minimum of 12 screws into the board (4 rows of 3). And, wherever possible try and keep your screws 15mm from your board edges and 50mm from board corners. Alkaline-resistant tape should also be placed over the joints. The last thing you will need to do before you start tiling is to prime the face of the board with a suitable primer if you are planning on tiling using a cement-based tile adhesive.

How to fit backer board to masonry walls

The good news is that both 6mm and 12mm HardieBacker cement boards can be used on masonry walls. Plus, as previously mentioned, they can take up to 200kg of tile hanging weight per m2 so almost any tile can be fixed. The backer boards should be installed onto a clean and smooth surface and all dry lining removed prior to installation. Place three vertical beads of high strength adhesive evenly down the back of the board and press firmly against the wall. The board joints should always be staggered in a brick pattern and fastened with 9 (6mm x 60mm) stainless steel screws into brown wall plugs. Ensure you do not overdrive the screws and the screw remains flush with the front of the board. Once secured cover the joints with an alkaline resistant tape. Just like the floor, prime the face of the board with a suitable primer if you are planning on using a cement-based adhesive. No priming is needed if you are going to be using a ready-mixed adhesive.

How to fit backer board to plaster or plasterboard

The process for boarding onto plaster or plasterboard is very similar to masonry walls – with a few slight differences. The first thing to do is locate any existing studs and mark the plasterboard or plaster. The boards can be installed either vertically or horizontally as long as you ensure all vertical joints are made in the centre of the studs. Make sure to leave a 3mm gap between the floor and wall edges and fill this with a good quality silicone sealant. Then fix stainless steel screws (a minimum of 45mm in length) at 200mm centres and every 200mm down each stud. Once secured, cover the joints with an alkaline resistant tape. Don’t forget to prime the face of the board with a suitable primer if you are planning on using a cement-based adhesive. No priming is needed if you are going to be using a ready-mixed adhesive.

How to fit backer board onto stud walls

We would recommend using 12mm HardieBacker boards when fixing tiles to stud walls. The backer boards can be installed either vertically or horizontally ensuring all vertical joints are made on the centre of the studs. Don’t forget to leave a 3mm gap between the floor and wall edges and fill this with a good quality silicone sealant. Then fix stainless steel screws (a minimum of 45mm in length) at 200mm centres and every 200mm down each stud. Once secured, cover the joints with an alkaline resistant tape. Don’t forget to prime the face of the board with a suitable primer if you are planning on using a cement-based adhesive. No priming is needed if you are going to be using a ready-mixed adhesive.

Backer board in wet rooms

Thanks to its all-weather resilience products such as HardieBacker can be used in wet rooms. However, prior to applying your backer board you will need to tank the area using either a liquid membrane or a matting system to ensure it is fully waterproof.

Need more information?

If you have any questions regarding selecting the right tiles for your home, then feel free to contact our Customer Services team using our web chat facility.

Recommended reads

If this has whetted your appetite to learn more about all things tiles, then why not check out these related advice articles: How to waterproof a wet room How to use matting
Read more